Text Box: PIANIST autographs
Text Box: HARMONIE AUTOGRAPHS AND MUSIC INC.

MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS & ANTIQUARIAN
Text Box: MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS AND EPHEMERA BOUGHT AND SOLD

Phone: 212-860-5541  *  Fax: 917-677-8247

 

Price: $100.00

NEAR MINT CONDITION

ISIDOR PHILIPP - PIANIST

The legendary pianist and pedagogue writes a note to a friend on his personal imprinted carte de visite listing his positions, Professeur au Conservatoire, Président de la Société Mutuelle des Professeurs and l’Association des Anciens Éléves du Conservatoire. On a card with a mourning border.

 

He writes:

 

Good sincere wishes dear Merkens memory for you and for your wife.

 

Philipp (1863-1958) was a pupil of  George Mathias, Stephen Heller, Henri Fissot, Camille Saint-Saëns and Théodore Ritter.  After winning first prize in Mathias’s class at the Conservatoire, he embarked on a solo career for 20 years, where he also formed a piano trio which bore his name.  In 1903, he was appointed professor of advanced piano at the Conservatoire, a position he held until his retirement in 1934.  The longest tenure held for that position at the time.  Philipp also taught at the American School at Fontainebleau during the Summers.

 

Philipp taught a number of the greats and near greats of the 20th Century, including in alphabetical order; Dwight Anderson, Grace Barnes, Jacqueline Blancard, Emma Boynet, Harold Bradley, Monique de la Bruchollerie, Serge Conus, Aaron Copland, Jeanne-Marie Darré, Pierre Dervaux, AniaDorfmann, Maurice Dumesnil, Rolande Falcinelli, Felix Fox, Jean Françaix, Madeleine Grovlez-Fourgeaud, Youra Guller, Marcelle Herrenschmidt, Renea Kyriakou, Fernando Laires, Yvonne Loriod, Paul Loyonnet, Nikita Magaloff, Denise Molié, Federico Mompou, Genia Nenenoff, Guiomar Novaes, Wilfrid Pelletier, Ida Perrin, Harrison Potter, Albert Schweitzer, Phyllis Sellick, Soulima Stravinsky, Louise Talma, Alexander Tcherepnin, Germaine Thyssens-Valentin, Edmond Trillat, Beveridge, Madeleine de Valmalète, Webster, and Victor Youngwell.

 

Philipp was known for his precision and exactitude and expected nothing less from his pupils.  He wrote a number of exercises, based upon the lessons of Mathias and also composed a number of lovely pieces for the piano.  As he had Jewish ancestry, Philipp left France for America in 1940, where he taught and lectured until after the War.  At the age of 91, he became the first nonagenarian to play at Carnegie Hall.  Precious few recordings exist of this major figure in the World of the piano.

 

We have not previously seen a Philipp carte de visite.