Text Box: JAZZ autographs
Text Box: HARMONIE AUTOGRAPHS AND MUSIC INC.

MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS & ANTIQUARIAN
Text Box: MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS AND EPHEMERA BOUGHT AND SOLD

Phone: 212-860-5541  *  Fax: 917-677-8247

 

Price: $250.00

MINT CONDITION

ORNETTE COLEMAN - SAXOPHONIST

Autographed stylized “The Fifties” 4” x 6” Tushita postcard photograph depicting the young Coleman playing his saxophone.  Photograph by William Claxton, 1959 with an illustrated Harlem scene behind him.

Coleman (1930-2015) was from Fort Worth Texas, his Father died when he was quite young and his young mother struggled to keep the family fed.  His Mother purchased a tenor saxophone for him and he learned to play by ear.  He created a band in high school called the Jam Jivers.  He initially went to Louisiana in 1949 to perform with a vaudeville traveling show called Silas Green from New Orleans.  After an incident where his tenor sax was destroyed, he started to play alto sax which was to become his instrument.  He joined a band in New Orleans run by Pee Wee Crayton and they travelled to Los Angeles which became his artistic home during the 1950’s.  Jazz was evolving from bee-bop in the late 1950’s and Miles Davis came out with “The Birth of Cool”.  The following year Coleman came out with his first record with his new quintet called, “Something Else, The Music of Ornette Coleman”.  In 1959 he went a step further and introduced “The Shape of Jazz to Come”.  A record of the same name was released on Atlantic Records.  He was also engaged at the Five Spot Jazz Club.  The next year he brought out a record called “Free Jazz” which became his hallmark and a sub genre of jazz.  While some like Leonard Bernstein, Lionel Hampton and Virgil Thomson applauded his genius, others like Miles Davis was not sure what to make of his new forms of jazz.  Coleman during this period spent time once a week with composer Gunther Schuller learning music theory and working on his composition.  In 1961, Schuller arranged “A Collection of Compositions of Ornette Coleman”.  It was a compendium folio of 10 works for jazz quartet and the original manuscripts of both composers are today in the Gunther Schuller Archives at the Library of Congress.

Coleman’s long career included some 52 recordings of his works as leader, 2 compilations and numerous recordings as a side man.  He concertized all over the Country and the World.  In 2007 he won the Pulitzer Prize for Music, for his recording “Sound Grammar”.  His last full concert was in San Francisco in November 2012.  That said, he participated in one last concert in Brooklyn on June 12, 2014 at an event called “Celebrate Ornette”.