Text Box: HARMONIE AUTOGRAPHS AND MUSIC INC.

MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS & ANTIQUARIAN
Text Box: MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS AND EPHEMERA BOUGHT AND SOLD

MINT CONDITION

Price: $185.00

Autographed note signed on the composer’s imprinted visiting card to conductor and violinist Jules Daubé.  Paladilhe sends a note of sympathy and admiration to the conductor.

Émile Paladilhe (1844-1926) was a protégé of Fromenthal Halevy and was admitted to the Conservatoire at the age of 9 under his auspices.  In addition to studying composition with Halevy, he also studied pianoforte under Marmontel taking first prize in piano in 1857 and first prize in organ and the Prix de Rome in 1860.  To that time, the youngest to ever win the prize for composers.  When he returned to France after his stay in Rome, it is customary for the composer to write an opera-comique to presented at the Opera-Comique.  Paladilhe had difficulty finding a librettist willing to write one for him.  He settled on Francois Coppee’s one act play “Le Passant” which was produced at the Opera Comique in April, 1872 with Célestine Galli-Marié, the first Carmen as the mezzo-soprano lead.  She was to become his lover.  An aria from the work, “La Mandolinata” was extracted from the work and became a World-wide hit.  It was heavily recorded at the turn of the 20th Century as an aria and today it exists mainly as a piece for concert band and is still performed.  It took him three years before he produced his next opera, also at the Opera-Comique in 1875 entitled “L’Amour d’Africaine”.  His first work which was considered important was the opera “Suzanne” in 1878 at the Opera Comique.  The work was a cricitcla success for it’s unique melodies, however, was not a smashing success.  He was awarded the Legion d’Honneur in 1881. In 1882 he brought out his “Fragments Symphoniques” at the Concerts Populaire.  The next opera, “Diana” at the opera-Comique in 1885 received four performances due to a dull libretto.  Victorien Sardou’s play “Patrie” was his next effort with the rights secured for a musical drama secured by writer and librettist Ernest Legouvé as a way to make amends for his poorly accepted libretto in “L’Amour d’Africaine”. (Legouvé had big hits with Cilea for “Adriana Lecouvreur”and “La mort d'Ophélie for Berlioz among others.)  He worked with both Sardou and Louis Gallet and this time his work was performed at the Opera, December 1886.  A big success, it was presented in Hamburg and at La Scala afterwards.  The composer’s lyric-drama “Saintes Marie de lar Mer” was presented in Montpelier and led to his indoctrination as a Member of the Institute in 1892.  Paladilhe also wrote a symphony, several masses, works for solo instruments, chamber works and many songs. His chanson “Psyché” is still well performed by major sopranos in concert and recordings.  While his art songs, solo wind music and “Saintes Marie” as a concert work survive, his opera save an occasional performance of “Patrie” have not been added to the regular repertory.

Jules Daubé (1840-1905) had a decorated career at the Opera-Comique as a conductor.  He led the World Premiers of “Les Contes d’Hoffmann”, “Manon” and “Lakmé” among others.  He also wrote violin music, played first desk violin at the Concerts de Conservatoire and taught there as well.  Daubé was the musical mentor of conductor Pierre Monteaux.

ÉMILE PALADILHE      - COMPOSER
Text Box: COMPOSER PHOTOGRAPHS

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