Text Box: Conductor autographs
Text Box: HARMONIE AUTOGRAPHS AND MUSIC INC.

MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS & ANTIQUARIAN
Text Box: MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS AND EPHEMERA BOUGHT AND SOLD

Price: $200.00

MINT CONDITION

Autographed three bar musical quotation marked Adagio on an 8” x 10” piece of staved paper, Boston, December 24, 1892.  We offer with an original Warren of Boston carte de visite photograph.

Zerrahn (1826-1909) was a true classical music pioneer in America.  Born in Mecklenberg Germany, he studied piano with Friedrich Weber, who also trained Ignaz Moscheles.  He received further training in Hanover and Berlin and embarked on a career as an orchestral flautist.  In 1848 with the March Revolution in Germany, a number of orchestral musicians including Zerrahn departed for America as the Germania Orchestra.  They based themselves in Boston and toured throughout the major cities of the United States.  One of the earliest professional orchestras to do so.  Zerrahn was the first desk flautist.  In 1854 the orchestra disbanded and Zerrahn was elected as conductor of the Handel and Haydn Society in Boston.  The following year, Zerrahn formed his own orchestra he called The Philharmonic Society in Boston.  He used his own funds, as well as those of sponsors to offer a concert series throughout the Boston area.  That orchestra was forced to disband due to the Civil War in 1863, as many of the players were drafted into the War.  So Boston was without an orchestra until 1866.  In 1866, the Harvard Music Association formed the Harvard Symphony Concerts made up of local musicians from Boston and Cambridge under the direction of Zerrahn.  A second Orchestra was formed, The Philharmonic Society, which had multiple conductors including Zerrahn, but it became difficult to support two orchestras in Boston.  The Harvard Symphony Concerts became the sole local orchestra in Boston until 1882, when the Boston Symphony Orchestra was formed and by 1883, the Harvard Symphony Concerts closed. Zerrahn continued to lead the Handel and Haydn Society through 1895, a tenure not rivaled to this day.  He was also Music Director of the famed annual Worcester Fall Festival from 1866 through 1898.  The conductor also conducted many other music festivals around the Country.  Zerrahn was Patrick Gilmore, or Gilmore’s Band fame’s chorus director.  During the 1869 and 1872 Peace Jubilee, Zerrhan conducted two choruses, the first made up of 10,000 individuals, the second of 20,000 individuals and they performed in both Boston and New York.  The 1872 concerts were led by Johann Strauss sohn.  Zerrahn also was a Professor for many years at the New England Conservatory where he taught singing, instrumentation and harmony, he retired in 1898 and lived until 1909.

A leading figure in the World of music.  At the time this musical quotation was written, Zerrahn was conducting the annual performances of Handel’s “Messiah”, that said, it is not from that work. 

           CARL ZERRAHN - CONDUCTOR

Phone: 212-860-5541  *  Fax: 917-677-8247