Text Box: PIANIST autographs
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Price: $200.00

MINT CONDITION

GEORGES CZIFFRA - PIANIST

Autographed and inscribed 3.5” x 4.75” half tone photographic card on heavy stock, 1965.

 

Cziffra (1921-1994) was still early in his Western career in 1965.  A partial chronology of recorded appearances for the year include; Paris in studio for EMI in January, a live concert with orchestra with the local radio orchestra in Luxembourg in March, live in London in April with concerts with the London Philharmonic, a live recital in Lugano in June, recordings in studio in Paris for EMI again in August, a live performance with the Orchestre Nationale in Paris in November and an interview with Bernard Gavoty in December which was taped and aired in January, 1966.

 

The pianist immigrated to France in 1956, escaping Hungary by way of Vienna. Prior to 1956 he was known exclusively from his Hungaraton recordings. Having been imprisoned first by the Russians during the War and then by the Communists, the Dohnanyi pupil was became better known in his own country as a jazz virtuoso. Until his escape from Hungary, he was essentially known there for his records due to his issues with the Communists. His concert in Vienna at the Brahmssaal on November 17, 1956 was a revelation and launched his career in the West. He literally arrived in Paris a day kater and was in the recording studio. His Paris debut was at the Theatre Chatelet on December 2nd. 

 

For the next few years, Cziffra maintained an extremely busy touring schedule making up for the lost time when he was a virtual prisoner in his own country. His concerts included many in numerous venues from the Chatelet to Salle Pleyel. (One will note a Pleyel piano was used for his concert in Grenoble.) He made his American debut in Chicago in July, 1957, as well as engagements in Great Britain, Italy, Switzerland, Canada and Luxembourg. He lived up to the hype of the greatest pyrotechnic classical virtuoso of his generation. His rendition of Liszt’s “Grande Gallop Chromatique” which seemed to be faster and faster every time he recorded it was an example of his precision technique.