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MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS & ANTIQUARIAN

Price: $250.00

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VÍTĚSLAV NOVÁK - COMPOSER
Text Box: MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS AND EPHEMERA BOUGHT AND SOLD
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Phone: 212-860-5541  *  Fax: 917-677-8247

 

Autographed and inscribed bi-fold score wrapper to the great Czech composer and pedagogues’ “Dvanáct Ukolébavek”, October, 1938.

The work in translation, “12 Lullabys for Women’s Choir, on Moravian Folk Texts”

Novak (1870-1949) studied law at the University of Prague.  Whilst studying law he multi-tasked and studied music as well at the Prague Conservatory; attending Dvorak’s composition master classes while also studying piano, theory and counterpoint.  He graduated from law school and the conservatory in 1892 and continued to study piano until 1896.  He initially taught piano privately and begun the collection of Bohemian folk songs which he used throughout his compositions.  He was appointed Professor of composition at the Prague Conservatory in 1909 and remained in that position until his retirement in 1939.  As a composition professor he was the most important in Czechoslovakia after Dvorak and that included Foerster and Janacek.  A partial list of his important pupils include; Oswald Chlubna, Jan Cikker, Sabin Dragoi, Alois Haba, Karel Haba, Ilja Hurnik, Otakar Jeremais, Jindrich Jindrich, Jan Kapr, Vitezlava Kapralova, Dezider Kardos, Mykola Kolessa, Isa Krejci, Jozsef Kresanek, Jaroslav Krombholz, Alexander Moyzes, Karel Nedbal, Andrej Ocenas, Slavko Osterc, Vilém Petrzelka, Frantisek Rauch, Klement Slavicky, Vaclav Stepan, Eugen Suchon, Vaclav Trojan, Boleslva Vornacka, Jaroslav Vogel.

As a composer, Novak is best known in what was Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and Austria.  His music is considered to be neo-romantic.  He was influenced by the German, Austrian and Czech romantic composers as well as the French impressionists.  His music retains a romantic flavor but also dabbles with the new dissonance at times.  The Czech’s consider him one of the finest composers and his work is still well performed there by both important and less important ensembles, be they the Czech Philharmonic, or an amateur string quartet.  Novak’s operas were a big deal in their day and many were premiered at the National Theatre.  He was an ardent anti-fascist and write his big symphonic work with organ “De Profundis” as a protest, though he looked at Stalin as a liberator.  His published works included four operas, two ballet pantomimes, fourteen works for symphony including a piano concerto, three string quartets, two piano trios and several works for violin, or cello and piano, seventeen individual works and cycles for piano.  As most Czech composers do, he wrote numerous choruses though very few based on religious works and most with an emphasis on folk song texts he had found over the years.  He also wrote numerous songs for solo voice also based on the folks songs.

Extremely rare!