Text Box: HARMONIE AUTOGRAPHS AND MUSIC INC.

MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS & ANTIQUARIAN
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Text Box: MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS AND EPHEMERA BOUGHT AND SOLD

Price: $200.00

FINE CONDITION

Autographed 1932 first edition, first issue sheet music for the song “We Will Always Be Sweethearts” from the 1932 film, “One Hour With You”, Souvenir de Oscar Straus, N.Y. 1940.

 

This first edition, first issue was printed in 1932 by Famous Music Corp, New York City.  The score consists of the cover we have shown, the second page is an advertisement for “Only A Rose” by Rudolf Friml, “Song of the Vagabonds” also by Friml and “Lonesome Road” by Nathaniel Shilkret.  The music begins on page three with the title above, Featured by Maurice Chevalier In His Latest Paramount Picture: “One Hour With You”. The waltz actually was a vehicle for Jeanette McDonald in the film to sing to Maurice Chevalier.  The music ends on page 5 and an advertisement is on the back cover for songs composed by Friml, Rubinoff, Rainger, Rodgers and Straus, through they spell his last name Strauss. (He dropped an “s” so not to be confused with his distant cousin’s Johann Strauss, his father and brothers, as well as Richard Strauss who was not a relation.

 

Oscar Straus was still living in Vienna in 1930 when Hollywood came calling.  He scored two original songs his first Hollywood film, an early talkie starring Grace Moore as Jenny Lind called, “A Ladies Morals”.  Straus was called in again to supply songs for the 1932  Maurice Chevalier, Jeanette McDonald, Genevieve Tobin film, “One Hour With You”.  For that film, Straus wrote the songs, “We Will Always Be Sweethearts” for Jeanette McDonald, “Oh That Mitzi” for Maurice Chevalier, “Three Times A Day” for Genevieve Tobin, “What A Little Thing A Wedding Can Do” as a duet for McDonald and Chevalier, and another duet for the pair, “It Was Only A Dream Kiss”.

 

Straus (1870-1954) was the leading operetta composer in Vienna during the Second Golden Age of Operetta in Vienna.  His operettas “Ein Waltzertraum” (A Waltz Dream” and “Der Tapfere Soldat” (The Chocolate Soldier) were huge international hits.  His early operetta, “Die Lustigen Niebelungen” which was not only a parody of Wagner’s “Ring Cycle” but also the German government had established him as a great operetta composer in 1904, though after the government discovered the hidden meanings in the work, it was shut down in Berlin initially, only to be resurrected in some of the more provincial cities with great success.  Music from his “Ein Waltzertraum” had been used in the score to accompany a number of silent films prior to his first venture in Hollywood.  He did not leave Vienna until 1939, first bound for France and in 1940 for the United States where he scored songs for American, British and French films through the early 1950’s. 

OSCAR STRAUS - COMPOSER
Text Box: COMPOSER AUTOGRAPHS

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