Text Box: FLAUTIST autographs
Text Box: HARMONIE AUTOGRAPHS AND MUSIC INC.

MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS & ANTIQUARIAN
Text Box: MUSIC AUTOGRAPHS AND EPHEMERA BOUGHT AND SOLD

Phone: 212-860-5541  *  Fax: 917-677-8247

 

Price: $150.00

MINT CONDITION

Autographed 6.5” x 11” presentation style photograph of the great Czech flautist, conductor, composer, musicologist and administrator, October 5, 1975.  The mounted image to heavy stock is a half tone image with his ensemble Ars Reviva in the background.

Munclinger (1923-1986) was born into an artistic family, his Father was the well known Czech operatic bass Josef Munclinger, his mother Lenka Honty was a Slovakian legitimate stage actress and his uncle was Tibor Honty a well known Slovakian photographer.  The flautist was admitted to the Prague Conservatory in 1942 where he studied flute with Jaroslav Cizek and Rudolf Cerny, composition with Alois Haba and conducting with Vaclav Talich.  He graduated first with a bachelors and then in 1950 with a masters from the Conservatory and a second masters degree in 1952 from Charles University. From 1946 to 1948 he was Talich’s assistant with his Czech Chamber Orchestra, the life time of the ensemble until the Czech government shut it down. He also was an apprentice during his conservatory years with the Silesian Philharmonic and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. In 1951, knowing of Munclinger’s interest in early music, Vaclav Talich encouraged him to form Ars Rediviva.  His wife, the concert pianist Viktorie Svihlikova gave up her important career on the piano recital and concert stage to devote herself to harpsichord and clavichord with the new ensemble.  At the time, only the French really had an affinity for such music which had been championed mainly by the Casadesus family.  So Munclinger was at the cutting edge of the early music revival.  He found not only a large audience for early music in Prague and then Czechoslovakia, but throughout Europe and eventually the United States.  Munclinger as a musicologist also spent time digging through libraries to find treatises on early music and performance practices and edited and translated them for publication in Czechoslovakia.  In 1951, Munclinger was introduced to Jean-Pierre Rampal who was to become a teacher of sorts, fellow musicologist, colleague and life-long friend.  Many of Rampal’s recordings of early music were made with Munclinger conducting the Ars Rediviva ensemble. Their first major sessions in 1955 won a Grande Prix du Disque for their recording Music Antiqua Bohemica. The catalog of their work together is quite large.  Munclinger also introduced Rampal to the composer Jindrich Feld who wrote a concerto for the flautist.  Their work together resulted in printed editions of composers works which had not been published in several centuries with Bärenreiter in Germany, IMC in New York and Supraphon in the Czech Republic. (Supraphon is generally known as a recording house but also has a music publishing wing.)  There are fabulous recordings of Munclinger acting as both flute soloist and conductor with the Ars Rediviva ensemble playing the Vivaldi flute concertos, the Wilhelm Bach Trio Sonata, the J.S. Bach Trio Sonata, and the C. P. Bach Trio Sonatas.  They are all splendid recordings and are in glorious sound and well worth your listening time.

This Czech collection has yielded some very interesting items.  In our thirty five years of collecting and then dealing over the past twenty, we have not seen this great musicians autograph offered.

MILAN MUNCLINGER – FLAUTIST